RESEARCH

RECENT PUBLICATIONS

“’THE RELIGION IS ASSAILED BY MOST IN THE COUNTRY’: A LETTER FROM THE FIRST MORMON CONVERTS IN JAMAICA, 1854”

Mormon Historical Studies 20:1 (Spring 2019): 111-27. Co-authored with Rachel Felt.

“FROM PROTESTANT SUPREMACY TO CHRISTIAN SLAVERY: A REVIEW OF KATHARINE GERBNER, CHRISTIAN SLAVERY: CONVERSION AND RACE IN THE PROTESTANT ATLANTIC WORLD

Black Perspectives (November 2018). Available here.

IN PROGRESS

BOOKS

“METHODISM, SLAVERY, AND FREEDOM IN THE REVOLUTIONARY ATLANTIC WORLD”

Book-length manuscript in preparation to submit to an academic press.

MISSIONARY INTERESTS: PROTESTANT AND MORMON MISSIONS IN THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES

Co-edited book proposal currently under review.

“FAMILY, FAITH, AND SLAVERY IN THE 18th CENTURY ATLANTIC WORLD: THE LIFE OF DORCAS LILLIE”

Book-length manuscript in preparation to submit to an academic press.

ARTICLES

“‘a very poor place for our doctrine’: empire, race, and polygamy in the first mormon mission to jamaica”

Currently under review at an academic journal.

CONFERENCES

Missionary Interests: PRotestant and mormon missions in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries

In November 2019, a dozen scholars will gather at the Church History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah, for a symposium I have co-organized with David Golding to present their research on some aspect of Protestant and/or Latter-day Saint missions. Although Mormon and Protestant missionaries competed for converts in the same regions and sought to achieve their own distinct theological and ecclesiastical objectives, the two groups often represented different sides of the same western imperialist project, seeking to not only convert but also civilize non-Christian groups around the globe. In spite of their encounters with one another in the mission field, the missionaries’ experiences have remained isolated from one another in modern historiography. Sponsored by the Church History Library and the Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship at Brigham Young University, the symposium aims to explore those entangled histories.